NWIPB OpenIR
The impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau
Chen, Huai1,2,3; Zhu, Qiuan2,3; Peng, Changhui2,4; Wu, Ning1,3,5; Wang, Yanfen3,6; Fang, Xiuqing4; Gao, Yongheng3,7; Zhu, Dan1,3; Yang, Gang2,3; Tian, Jianqing3,8; Kang, Xiaoming6; Piao, Shilong9,10; Ouyang, Hua11; Xiang, Wenhua12; Luo, Zhibin2; Jiang, Hong13; Song, Xingzhang13; Zhang, Yao2; Yu, Guirui11; Zhao, Xinquan1,14; Gong, Peng15; Yao, Tandong9; Wu, Jianghua16; Peng, CH (reprint author), Northwest Agr & Forest Univ, Lab Ecol Forecasting & Global Change, Coll Forestry, Yangling 712100, Peoples R China.
2013-10-01
Source PublicationGLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY
ISSN1354-1013
Volume19Issue:10Pages:2940-2955
SubtypeReview
AbstractWith a pace of about twice the observed rate of global warming, the temperature on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (Earth's third pole') has increased by 0.2 degrees C per decade over the past 50years, which results in significant permafrost thawing and glacier retreat. Our review suggested that warming enhanced net primary production and soil respiration, decreased methane (CH4) emissions from wetlands and increased CH4 consumption of meadows, but might increase CH4 emissions from lakes. Warming-induced permafrost thawing and glaciers melting would also result in substantial emission of old carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission was not stimulated by warming itself, but might be slightly enhanced by wetting. However, there are many uncertainties in such biogeochemical cycles under climate change. Human activities (e.g. grazing, land cover changes) further modified the biogeochemical cycles and amplified such uncertainties on the plateau. If the projected warming and wetting continues, the future biogeochemical cycles will be more complicated. So facing research in this field is an ongoing challenge of integrating field observations with process-based ecosystem models to predict the impacts of future climate change and human activities at various temporal and spatial scales. To reduce the uncertainties and to improve the precision of the predictions of the impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles, efforts should focus on conducting more field observation studies, integrating data within improved models, and developing new knowledge about coupling among carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus biogeochemical cycles as well as about the role of microbes in these cycles.; With a pace of about twice the observed rate of global warming, the temperature on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (Earth's third pole') has increased by 0.2 degrees C per decade over the past 50years, which results in significant permafrost thawing and glacier retreat. Our review suggested that warming enhanced net primary production and soil respiration, decreased methane (CH4) emissions from wetlands and increased CH4 consumption of meadows, but might increase CH4 emissions from lakes. Warming-induced permafrost thawing and glaciers melting would also result in substantial emission of old carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission was not stimulated by warming itself, but might be slightly enhanced by wetting. However, there are many uncertainties in such biogeochemical cycles under climate change. Human activities (e.g. grazing, land cover changes) further modified the biogeochemical cycles and amplified such uncertainties on the plateau. If the projected warming and wetting continues, the future biogeochemical cycles will be more complicated. So facing research in this field is an ongoing challenge of integrating field observations with process-based ecosystem models to predict the impacts of future climate change and human activities at various temporal and spatial scales. To reduce the uncertainties and to improve the precision of the predictions of the impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles, efforts should focus on conducting more field observation studies, integrating data within improved models, and developing new knowledge about coupling among carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus biogeochemical cycles as well as about the role of microbes in these cycles.
KeywordCarbon Budget Ice Retreat Intact Ecosystems Land Use Change Permafrost
WOS HeadingsScience & Technology ; Life Sciences & Biomedicine
WOS KeywordECOSYSTEM CO2 EXCHANGE ; DELAYED SPRING PHENOLOGY ; ALPINE MEADOW ECOSYSTEM ; PERMAFROST DEGRADATION ; METHANE EMISSIONS ; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS ; GRAZING INTENSITY ; PLANT-COMMUNITIES ; THERMOKARST LAKES ; SOIL RESPIRATION
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS Research AreaBiodiversity & Conservation ; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
WOS SubjectBiodiversity Conservation ; Ecology ; Environmental Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000323844200003
Citation statistics
Cited Times:181[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://210.75.249.4/handle/363003/3924
Collection中国科学院西北高原生物研究所
Corresponding AuthorPeng, CH (reprint author), Northwest Agr & Forest Univ, Lab Ecol Forecasting & Global Change, Coll Forestry, Yangling 712100, Peoples R China.
Affiliation1.Chinese Acad Sci, Chengdu Inst Biol, Chengdu 610041, Peoples R China
2.Northwest Agr & Forest Univ, Lab Ecol Forecasting & Global Change, Coll Forestry, Yangling 712100, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Zoige Peatland & Global Change Res Stn, Hongyuan 624400, Peoples R China
4.Univ Quebec, Inst Environm Sci, Dept Biol Sci, Montreal, PQ C3H 3P8, Canada
5.Int Ctr Integrated Mt Dev, Kathmandu, Nepal
6.Chinese Acad Sci, Grad Univ, Beijing 100039, Peoples R China
7.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Mt Hazards & Environm, Chengdu 610041, Peoples R China
8.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Microbiol, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
9.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Tibetan Plateau Res, Beijing 100085, Peoples R China
10.Peking Univ, Coll Urban & Environm Sci, Beijing 100871, Peoples R China
11.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geog Sci & Nat Resources Res, Beijing 100101, Peoples R China
12.Cent South Univ Forestry & Technol, Res Sect Forest Ecol, Changsha 410004, Hunan, Peoples R China
13.Zhejiang Agr & Forestry Univ, Zhejiang Prov Key Lab Carbon Cycling & Carbon Seq, Linan 311300, Peoples R China
14.Chinese Acad Sci, Northwest Inst Plateau Biol, Xining 810008, Peoples R China
15.Tsinghua Univ, Ctr Earth Syst Sci, Beijing 100084, Peoples R China
16.Mem Univ Newfoundland, Corner Brook, NF A2H 5G4, Canada
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Chen, Huai,Zhu, Qiuan,Peng, Changhui,et al. The impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau[J]. GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY,2013,19(10):2940-2955.
APA Chen, Huai.,Zhu, Qiuan.,Peng, Changhui.,Wu, Ning.,Wang, Yanfen.,...&Peng, CH .(2013).The impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY,19(10),2940-2955.
MLA Chen, Huai,et al."The impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau".GLOBAL CHANGE BIOLOGY 19.10(2013):2940-2955.
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